Dissolving into Vast Spacious Awareness

One hour guided Nondual Meditation by Michael W. Taft.

Begins with breath awareness, then contacting vast, spacious awareness, then dissolving into awareness with each exhale.

Finally, noticing the vivid and shocking quality of sensory display.

Ends at 1:02:45 Followed by a talk about the differing philosophies of the three Buddhist vehicles, and Q&A.

Comments

  1. Yeah, cause you get to a point in meditation where it’s really not about relief from suffering any more. So then why do you still meditate? I’m meditating now to open my mind up to creativity. Letting go of conditioned knowledge, going beyond the ‘known’, the expected…sort of an application of Krishnamurti’s teaching. In fact, in K’s book The Only Revolution, Page 1, he says exactly that. What I love about K is that he got to the same place Buddha did, but by a different route, w/o rigid Buddhist doctrine. It’s refreshing and liberating.

  2. Michael

    Experientially when awareness was expanded I was able to put to the side any contact and focus on awareness itself. It felt to me more like the potential for awareness. Interestingly the one thing I did have some difficulty putting to the side was a little image of a meditator (me) floating around in a vast space. The image would creep towards the side but never really make it there. Awareness was not projected from this image but going towards it. Also when I shifted awareness to sensory contact itself the potential of awareness as imagined from the vast perspective was actually manifested. This still did not feel like it was generated by a decider of what will be known (me). It’s mysterious to me in every moment what will be known and surely dependent on this particular organisms conditioning. The best I can do is apply the four efforts of abandon,guard against, cultivate, and establish when reacting skillfully vs unskillfully to this mysterious process!

  3. Oops… this comment was supposed to be posted under awareness of awareness meditation

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